gayharlem



Abyssinian-Baptist-Church.jpg
The Garden of Joy was torn down in the mid-1920s in order to build the Abyssinian Baptist Church


This was the open-air cabaret of the Blues singer, Mamie Smith, located on 7th Avenue between 138th and 139th Streets. It was a plateau with a large, wooden floor complete with tables, chairs, and an orchestra and propped-up roof. Musician, Coleman Hawkins played here with Mamie Smith for a while also. This club was predominantly Black—only a few white people may be spotted by chance. It catered to homosexuals and heterosexuals alike. Down the street, the Abyssinian Baptist Church would hold its camp meetings, so a mixture of Blues and gospel could be heard throughout the summer nights. Eventually, however, The Garden of Joy would be torn down and replaced by the Abyssinian Baptist Church.

Resources:

Huggins, Nathan Irvin. Voices from the Harlem Renaissance. New York: Oxford UP, 1995. Print.

"PBS - JAZZ A Film By Ken Burns: Selected Artist Biography - Coleman Hawkins." PBS: Public Broadcasting Service. Web.
04 May 2011. <http://www.pbs.org/jazz/biography/artist_id_hawkins_coleman.htm>.

Wintz, Cary D., and Paul Finkelman. Encyclopedia of the Harlem Renaissance. New York: Routledge, 2004. Print.